St. Shenouda the Archimandrite Coptic Society

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Nineteenth St. Shenouda-UCLA Conference of Coptic Studies Registration Form

July 20-21, 2018

Presentations @ UCLA, Royce Hall Room 314, Los Angeles California 90095



Registration Fee (Suggested Contributions):

Click here for online registration. Registration fees to paid at the door.

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Schedule:

Schedule: The following is the final schedule for the conference:

Friday, July 20, 2018

9:00-10:00 a.m. Registration
10:00-10:05 a.m.
Opening Remarks by Prof. Kathlyn Cooney, Chair of UCLA- NELC Department
10:05-11:00 a.m. Presetations
11:00-11:15 a.m. Break
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Presentations
12:15-1:30 p.m. Lunch Break

1:30-3:00 p.m.

Presentations
3:00-3:15 p.m. Break
3:15-4:45 p.m. Presentations
 
7:30-8:30 p.m. Tour of the new edition of the Bible in Egypt Exhibit at the Coptic Cultural Museum of the St. Shenouda Center for Coptic Studies, located at 1494 So. Robertson Blvd, LA, CA 90035, Ste 200.

Saturday, July 21, 2018

8:30-9:30 a.m. Registration
9:30-10:00 a.m. Hany N. Takla, Where we are now -The State of the Society 2017-2018
10:00-11:00 a.m. Presentations
11:00-11:15 a.m. Break
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Presentations
12:15-1:30 p.m. Lunch Break
1:30-2:45 p.m. Presentations
2:45-3:00 p.m. Break
3:00-4:15 p.m. Presentations
4:15-4:30 p.m. Break/Pictures
4:30-5:15 p.m.

Business Meeting of the Members of St. Shenouda the Archimandrite Coptic Society

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Location:

The Conference will be located on the Campus of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Royce Hall, Room 314.

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Directions and Parking:

Coming from the south or from the Santa Monica Freeway:
Take the 405 N, Exit Wilshire East (Bear to the right at the exit)
Turn Right on Wilshire Blvd.
Turn Left on Westwood Ave. (the 3rd traffic light after exiting the fwy)
Turn Right on Leconte Ave
then turn Left on Hilgard Ave (the second light after turning into Le Conte
Turn Left on Westholme Drive, then turn right immediately in a driveway to the information kiosk.
Request parking in Lot #2, parking is $12 per day, Saturday $8, Handicap $5and mention that you attending the 15th St. Shenouda - UCLA Conference of Coptic Studies at Royce Hall.
The attendant at the booth can direct you to Royce Hall.
Enter in the left-most door of Royce Hall and take the elevator up to the third floor (Room #314).

Coming from the north (The San Fernando Valley):
Take the 405 S, Exit Sunset East
Turn Left on Sunset Blvd.
Turn Right on Hilgard Ave.
Turn Right on Westholme Drive, then turn right immediately in a driveway to the information kiosk.
Request parking in Lot #2, parking is $12 per day, Saturday $8, Handicap $6.
The attendant at the booth can direct you to Royce Hall as indicated above.
Enter in the left-most door of Royce Hall and take the elevator up to the third floor (Room #314).

 

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List of Speakers (Tentative):

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Abstracts:

 

Title: TBA

Presenter: Rev. Edens Elvéus

Abstract

TBA

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Title: Osirian Motifs in the Martyrdom of St. Peter of Alexandria

Presenter: Prof. Salim Faraji

Abstract

The ancient Egyptian deity Osiris was the preeminent god of resurrection throughout the history of ancient Egyptian civilization. For Egyptian Christians it would have been effortless for them to have applied the concept of Osirian death and resurrection that had existed in their culture for over three thousand years to the new Christian ideology of resurrection. The Martyrdom of St. Peter Alexandria suggests that Peter was regarded as an Osirian figure and upon his death the various post-mortem rituals attest to the reverence of not only a deceased bishop, but a transfigured Pharaoh. The episode of Peter's death in the Martyrdom is an example of acculturation in early Egyptian Christianity and therefore demonstrates the manner in which Christian traditions in Egypt were "Egyptianized" and made into expressions of ancient Egyptian culture and spirituality.

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Title: The Crisis of Coptic Studies and the Identity of the Copts

Presenter: Prof. Gawdat Gabra

Abstract

TBA

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Title: TBA

Presenter: Dr. George Ghaly

Abstract

TBA

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Title: TBA

Presenter: Ms. Mary Ghattas

Abstract

TBA

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Title: The Development of the Jurisdiction of the Bishop of Alexandria over Egypt from the First to the Fourth Centuries

Presenter: Fr. Theodore Labib

Abstract

“Let the ancient customs in Egypt, Libya and Pentapolis prevail, that the Bishop of Alexandria have jurisdiction in all these…”. 

By the time the Bishops of the Empire had gathered in Nicaea in AD 325, their official stance was that the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Alexandria over Egypt was undisputed. How this jurisdiction developed from the beginnings of Christianity in Egypt to the time of the Council is the subject of this paper.

Examining several primary and secondary sources on the topic, it is observed that from the first to the fourth centuries, the hierarchical structure of the Egyptian Church went through three main phases:

Phase 1: From the coming of Mark the Evangelist to Egypt (ca. AD 43) to the end of the patriarchate of Julian (AD 179-189). This is the period of the evangelization of Egypt, with the sole Egyptian bishop being that of Alexandria.

Phase 2: From the patriarchate of Demetrius (AD 189-232) to the Council of Nicaea in AD 325 during the patriarchate of Alexander (AD 312-328). This is the period of the emergence of the Egyptian ecclesial hierarchy.

Phase 3: From Nicaea to the end of the patriarchate of Athanasius (AD 328-373). This is the period of consolidation of the ecclesial hierarchy at the end of which, the bishop of Alexandria emerges as the undisputed leader of the Egyptian Church.

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Title: ‘On Learning a New Alphabet’:  Female Teachers and Students in Coptic Monasticism

Presenter: Prof. Lillian Larsen

Abstract

While women's roles as teachers in later monasticism are well documented, less consistent interest has been directed towards exploring the shape of women’s pedagogical investments in the earliest periods of monastic life. In addressing this lacuna, the present paper argues that recognizing the shape of women’s education in the primary layers of monastic source material remains foundational to more precise identification of women’s involvement in a longer teaching legacy. Likewise, the emergent contours of Egyptian practice usefully elucidate and balance registers of female investment within a broader pedagogical and monastic frame.

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Title: TBA

Presenter: Dr. S. Michael Saad

Abstract

TBA

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Title: TBA

Presenter: Dr. Mohamed Saleh

Abstract

TBA

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Title: Coptic Literature in a Digital Age: New Models for Scholarship

Presenter: Prof. Carolyn Schroeder

Abstract

TBA

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Title: TBA

Presenter: Ms. Tamara Siuda

Abstract

TBA

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Title: Butrus al-Sadamanti’s ‘The Story of Babnudah’: The Eventful Career of a Hidden Servant

Presenter: Prof. Mark Swanson

Abstract

 

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Title: Kitab al Durug by Patriarch John XVIII: Survey of SSACS ML.MS.207

Presenter: Mr. Hany N. Takla

Abstract

The St. Shenouda Society acquired a very rare Arabic manuscript in early 2016, containg the Kitab al-Durug of Patriarch John XVIII. This book is a collection of encyclical letters of this late 18th century Patriarch of the Coptic Orthodox Church along with some works of his immediate predecessor on the throne of St. Mark. The manuscript is unique in its contents, age, scribe, and owner. This paper will survey these aspects of the manuscripts and compare the contents with the earliest known copy of this manuscript, preserved at the Cairo Patriarchal Library, written by the same scribe just three years earlier!

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Title: The Education of Shenoute and Other Cenobitic Leaders: New Sources and New Interpretations

Presenter: Prof. Janet Timbie

Abstract

Monastic texts, including rules, sermons, and letters, written in the fourth and fifth centuries by Pachomius (d. 346) and his successors, and by Shenoute (d. 465) and Besa, provide some information about the education of Coptic-speaking monks who joined their communities. Many details in the texts indicate that monks in the Pachomian Koinonia and the White Monastery Federation came from a range of socioeconomic levels and their social status might align with their pre-monastic level of education. But the study of education inside and outside these monasteries is complicated by a language question, since the fourth and fifth centuries also saw the rise of written Coptic for both literary and non-literary material. Was monolingual Coptic education available, or was bilingual Greek-Coptic education the norm? Which type was the norm inside the monasteries? New evidence and a re-examination of older material may offer some help toward answering these questions.

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Title: Habits of the Heart: Some Coptic Sayings of St. Antony the Great from Vatican Copt 64, A Meditation

Presenter: Rev. Prof. Tim Vivian

Abstract

A camel, a horse, a troupe of pigs rising from the waters of the Nile; an ostrich with its young; genuflecting crocodiles; souls flying up to heaven, a malevolent giant stopping some of them; a female monk who has transgressed; a dummy dressed up like a monk with demons attacking it; fiery lamps and a chorus of angels. These “characters” in Coptic sayings attributed to St. Antony the Great (251-356) may seem the fanciful trappings of the picaresque, the overstuffed stage props of a simple people in a simpler time.

But the central element that informs each human life is the habits of the heart. In Coptic, het means both “heart” and “mind.” Thus, Coptic does not share the Western dualism between intellect and emotion, as if each existed independent of the other. In the thirty sayings discussed here forms of het occur twenty-five times, sometimes obscured by the necessary English renderings. Moreover, in the sayings here, the heart is not a lonely hunter; the heart has other hearts within community. Early monastic communities had spiritual teachers, guides, to help discern the heart’s habits. A pre-eminent guide was Abba Antony.

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Title: The Architectural, Engineering, and Construction Features for St. Mark Cathedral in Abbasiah Neighborhood, Cairo, Egypt

Presenter: Mr. Raafat Youssef

Abstract

As we are celebrating the 50th anniversay of the opening of St. Mark Cathedral in Cairo, then the largest Christian Cathedral in the Middle East, it is time to look back at a recent history worthy to be remembered by Copts today. This paper will review some of the interesting features found in the history, financing, and construction of this monumental cathedral along with an overview of the Wall Painitng and Icons program in it.

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Title: The Readings for the Eucharist-Bride Ceremony

Presenter: Dr. Youhanna N. Youssef

Abstract

In this paper we will overview the reading system in the Coptic Church. We will discuss the different editions of the matrimony rite. We will make a classification of the available manuscripts of this rite and the other sources. We will conclude with a comparison with readings of the matrimony and the reading of the liturgy following this rite and brief commentaries.

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Prepared by Hany N. Takla, Jun 14, 2018

For more information contact: info@stshenouda.org